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Archive for the ‘Burnout’ Category

The Stress Doesn’t Always Go Away When a Loved One Dies | by Linda Brendle

I recently came across an article in the New York Times originally posted on January 30 titled “For some Caregivers, the Trauma Lingers.” It was written by Judith Graham, and it’s about PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) in caregivers. Graham says there has been little research on the topic which, she thinks, means it has been overlooked or discounted. She goes on to list some of the typical symptoms of PTSD: flashbacks, feelings of numbness, anxiety, guilt, dread, depression, irritability, apathy, and tension among others. (more…)

Cross Generational Caregivers | by Linda Brendle

No generation gap here.

No generation gap here.

I’m at that age that some poetically call the Autumn of Life, and I’m approaching Winter more quickly than I care to admit. But whatever you call it, it’s a season when end of life issues demand more attention than they did in earlier years. I lost both my parents in the last two years, and I spend more time looking at sympathy cards than congratulation cards lately. We’ve had two deaths in our church family recently, and while the situations were very different in most ways, there was a similarity that is worth a little attention – cross-generational caregivers. (more…)

Celebrating Caregivers | by Linda Brendle

Image representing CaringBridge as depicted in...

Image via CrunchBase

I recently read an article on the CaringBridge website titled We’re Celebrating National Caregiver Month – and You. The article talked about what was special about caregivers and invited caregivers to leave comments about why they do what they do, what makes a good caregiver and advice to other caregivers. Always hoping that my experience can be of some help to others, I left a short comment, but I continued to think about National Caregiver Month. Special times devoted to special people are often celebrated by giving gifts or doing something special for the honoree, and I thought about some of the special things people did for me while I was a caregiver. There were lots, but one day in particular stood out in my mind. (more…)

Bringing Alzheimer’s Out of the Closet | by Linda Brendle

I almost began this post with I haven’t written much in the last week or so, but that’s not really accurate. I’ve written a lot: agendas for meetings; e-mails announcing meetings and encouraging people to attend; copy for flyers, posters and the church website; more e-mails answering questions. Our church is hosting an area-wide ladies’ conference in January, and our pastor asked me to coordinate the event. If I could re-wind to that moment when I said Sure, why not, I might think again before answering.

Seriously, I’m enjoying the experience, and the response from people who are willing to help has been amazing, but it’s also amazing how much time and focus is required. Something else that is amazing is how, in spite of no longer being directly involved with Alzheimer’s and being totally focused on something other than my writings about caring for those with the disease, I am still faced with Alzheimer’s again and again. (more…)

Put Your Oxygen Mask On First | by Linda Brendle

Becoming a caregiver is not something most of us plan for, go to school for, or train for. When I became a full-time caregiver, I had no idea of how to do it well or how to deal with the difficulties I encountered. I expected to find lots of help in Florida where the population is decidedly on the gray side. Although I found a few sources, websites were confusing and hard to negotiate, and agencies were even more confusing and difficult. What I really wanted was to sit with experienced caregivers who could tell me what to do. I talked with the counseling pastor at my church, and as often happens when you point out a need, he agreed and suggested that I start a group. The short version is that after much thought, prayer, and the agreement of another couple to partner with us, David and I became facilitators of a caregivers’ support group. Following are my opening remarks from our first meeting: (more…)

When Reality Bites, Write | By Guest Blogger Krista Krueger

English: The autism friendly mark for use on t...

This blog sort of fits with my blog at www.kompletelykrista.wordpress.com  called Writing and Reality because this is part of the reality that goes with my writing.  One of my daughters is Autistic and that takes up a lot of my time.  The more therapies, the more interaction that she gets, are all things that help her development.  One of my sons also has what has been termed as delayed, so he needs less but still some help in maturing and that kind of stuff.  The amount of meetings I go to during the school year is amazing.  My husband works two jobs so that I can stay home and take care of her and the other two kids.  For roughly six years I’ve been doing this by myself.  Sometimes people try to help but when it comes to our kids, we’re very specific about who can watch them for us to get an hour out to maybe grab something to eat and that hasn’t been able to happen for a long time now. (more…)

Caregivers: Heroes with a Different Kind of Courage

I may be a country girl and a grandma, too, but I’m a pretty up-to-date lady. I even have my own Twitter account (@LindaBrendle in case you haven’t followed me yet). In the four months since I’ve been a member of the Twitterverse, I’ve met a lot of interesting people. One of my new friends is Scott Allison, Professor of Psychology at the University of Richmond, co-author of Heroes: What They Do and Why We need Them, and co-owner of a blog by the same name. When I tweeted him that caregivers are heroes, too, he was kind enough to invite me to be a guest blogger.  Read my post called Caregivers: Heroes with a Different Kind of Courage at:

http://blog.richmond.edu/heroes/2012/07/07/caregivers-are-heroes/

Blessings,

Linda

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