On caregivers, faith, family, and writing…

Posts tagged ‘Alzheimer’s Association’

Blog Tour Continues with a Review from TaLynn at Ink in the Book

A Long and Winding Road

Talynn at Ink in the Book had some very nice things to say about my new memoir, A LONG AND WINDING ROAD: A Caregiver’s Tale of Life, Love, and Chaos. You can read her review HERE.

We’ll take a break tomorrow to celebrate the Fourth of July. Enjoy a day full of fun and food with your family and friends as we remember Independence Day.

On Saturday, we’ll stop at “Dialogue with Doris” to read another review. To see a complete itinerary of the tour, CLICK HERE.

Blessings,

Linda

A LONG AND WINDING ROAD: A Caregiver’s Tale of Life, Love, and Chaos

Available now at:

B&N // Kobo // iTunes // Amazon // Smashwords // Google Play

About the BookSometimes reality really bites. Alzheimer’s has wrapped Mom’s brain into knots, vascular dementia has attacked Dad, and, instead of carefree retirees, we have become caregivers. Regardless, dreams die hard, and we somehow stumbled into the purchase of a forty-foot motor home. That’s when all four of us set out on this seven-week trek across sixteen U.S. states. Now, Dad stopped-up the toilet again, Mom wet her last pair of clean jeans, and David just announced that he was hungry. My head is beginning to pound, and I know this isn’t going to be the easygoing retirement we’d imagined for ourselves.

Linda Brendle takes you on a roller-coaster ride of emotional and spiritual challenges that many families are facing right now. Co-dependency, mental breakdowns, and finding love after divorce are just a few of the issues weaved into this journey of caregiving. Whether you’re looking for an inspirational story to help teach you how to “let go and let God,” considering becoming the caregiver for one of your own parents, or are just looking for an entertaining travel book, this story is sure to strike a tender nerve.

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Be Creative but Wary when Planning Activities for Alzheimer’s Patients | by Linda Brendle

Mom and me.

Mom and me.

When trying to decide what to write about this morning, I pulled out my “Sources” file and looked for ideas. After 300+ blog posts, it’s sometimes a challenge to come up with something new and fresh. There’s a new game on Facebook involving a list of things your friends might not know about you. I considered writing something like that, but at this point, anything I haven’t already written about myself is probably something I don’t want to reveal, so I went back to the file.

 

One item that caught my eye was an article on the Alzheimer’s Association website called “101 Activities.” It offers simple suggestions of things to do with your Alzheimer’ patient like listening to music, coloring a picture, or tossing a ball. There is no further explanation and no warning of how these simple activities might backfire. However, as you might imagine, I have a couple of tales that might give a caregiver pause before engaging in some of the activities. (more…)

Alzheimer’s Video – Rick Phelps Talks about Reference Points in Memory Loss

For those who don’t know about him, Rick Phelps was diagnosed with Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease in 2010 at the age of 57. In the hopes of raising awareness about the disease, he has made a number of videos  about his personal journey. With the same goal in mind, I’ve been posting his videos each Sunday. In today’s video, Rick talks about how loss of reference points affects a dementia patient’s ability to understand some things we take for granted like time and date. In the last half of the video, he tries to give caregivers a patient’s perspective on some common battlegrounds like hygiene issues. He also talks about his feelings about being placed in a residential care facility when the time comes. (more…)

Bringing Alzheimer’s Out of the Closet | by Linda Brendle

I almost began this post with I haven’t written much in the last week or so, but that’s not really accurate. I’ve written a lot: agendas for meetings; e-mails announcing meetings and encouraging people to attend; copy for flyers, posters and the church website; more e-mails answering questions. Our church is hosting an area-wide ladies’ conference in January, and our pastor asked me to coordinate the event. If I could re-wind to that moment when I said Sure, why not, I might think again before answering.

Seriously, I’m enjoying the experience, and the response from people who are willing to help has been amazing, but it’s also amazing how much time and focus is required. Something else that is amazing is how, in spite of no longer being directly involved with Alzheimer’s and being totally focused on something other than my writings about caring for those with the disease, I am still faced with Alzheimer’s again and again. (more…)

Warning Signs of Alzheimer’s – Part 10 of 10 | by Linda Brendle

As I typed “Part 10 of 10,” I felt a little like Johnny Carson as Carnac the Magnificent saying, “I hold in my hand the last envelope.” Unlike his audience, I hope my readers aren’t clapping and hurrahing at the end of a long, tedious series.

The last warning sign is changes in mood and personality. All of us, especially as we get older, develop specific ways of doing things, and we sometimes become irritable when a routine is disrupted. Once again, Alzheimer’s may cause people to carry this irritation to extremes: (more…)

Warning Signs of Alzheimer’s – Part 9 of 10 | by Linda Brendle

We all sometimes leave an old hobby for a while to try something new, and we all sometimes get tired of work, family and social obligations. But someone with Alzheimer’s may exhibit more extreme signs of withdrawal from social, family and work activities: (more…)

Warning Signs of Alzheimer’s – Part 8 of 10 | by Linda Brendle

Poor judgment!

Have you ever made a bad decision? What about that used car that the guy assured you was in mint condition, or those expensive designer shoes that hurt your feet just a little bit, or that boyfriend you forgave because he swore she was just a friend. Yeah, we’ve all had lapses in judgment from time to time, but people with Alzheimer’s take “decreased or poor judgment” to a whole new level: (more…)

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