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Posts tagged ‘Animals’

Cat hair? Don’t care! by Linda Brendle

Published in the Rains County Leader on November 26,2019.

Pet hairSunday morning while I was drying my hair, David came into the bathroom with Kitty trailing not far behind. They were carrying on an animated conversation – at least he was. She wore her usual bored expression.

“Kitty, have you looked at the carpet? Why do you leave clumps of hair all over the place?” he asked.

She must have known it was a rhetorical question, because she yawned and lay down on the bedroom carpet where I’m sure she deposited more hair. If she had answered, she would probably have said something like, “Cat hair? Don’t care!”

When we chose carpet for the house, we would have chosen a color other than light beige if we had known that we would one day own a black and white semi-long-haired cat. Of course, the white hair would have been just as obvious on a darker color. The same dilemma applies to clothing – the black hair shows on light-colored clothes and the white hair shows on dark things. The only solution for owners of black and white cats is to go naked, but that presents an entirely different set of problems.

I don’t really understand Kitty’s shedding cycle. When the weather was hot, I expected cat sheddingher to lose half her body weight through hair loss, but she just seemed to get furrier. Then, when it began to cool off, she began to leave clumps of hair like Hansel and Gretel’s bread crumbs. I went online to see what is “normal” when it comes to shedding, and this is what I found:

Cats who are allowed to go in and out or who live outside will shed seasonally. Indoor cats may also respond to the calendar, but typically they shed all year, although this may vary by breed. In general, it’s fair to say that cats shed some degree of “winter” coat in the spring and summer.

I’m grateful that she doesn’t shed all year, but I’m not surprised. It says the typical indoor cat sheds all year, and Kitty’s anything but typical. She’s just ornery.

Last week I posted a picture of Kitty on my Facebook page. One of my friends sent this reply along with a photo of her black and white cat:

Mrs. Linda, tell Kitty that Jinx would like to meet her.

Kitty on the afghanThis was my response:

I’m not sure how Kitty would feel about that. She’s not generally very sociable, but she might surprise me! On the other hand, she might be jealous of Jinx’ beautiful, smooth coat. Kitty sometimes looks shiny and pretty, but sometimes she looks like a hairball waiting to happen!

Obviously, my response was written. If Kitty heard me say something like that, I’d probably end up with a giant hairball on my pillow.

Blessings,

Linda

Kitty’s Story

Fallen Angel Salvage

Tatia’s Tattoo

Mom’s Long Goodbye

A Long and Winding Road

No Baths for the Brendles | by Linda Brendle

Published in the Rains County Leader on November 5, 2019:

The earliest freeze on record in North Texas was on October 22, 1898. We missed that record by a few days, but the low temperatures last week still had lots of Rains County residents scrambling to move vulnerable plants indoors. I haven’t been part of the scramble in the past, because my indoor plants stayed in the house year round, and my outdoor plants were planted in the ground and were on their own when the temperatures dropped. This year was different.

hibiscusSince Kitty came to live with us over four years ago, her interest in all things green and leafy has caused me to limit our indoor plants to those that have been given to us for one reason or another. We have two peace lilies – one was a sympathy gift when Mom passed away, and one was a Christmas gift. I also have two Christmas cacti and an African violet that were give to me for one reason or another.

The lilies were confined to the small bathroom in the front of the house when Kitty decided they were particularly tasty and that the dirt in their pots was fun to dig in. The smaller plants have been relatively safe on the island in the kitchen except for the one time Kitty decided to dig up the violet. It must not have been as exciting as she had expected, because she hasn’t revisited it. The plant has recovered, but it hasn’t bloomed since its trauma.

Earlier this year, when our neighbor Ed built our new porch, he added a plant ledge to the front, and my friend Mary envisioned hanging baskets of red begonias. I didn’t find any affordable baskets, but I did find two hibiscus “trees” on sale. They looked beautiful on the ledge, and their continuous blooms added lots of summer color. My neighbor Connie later shared some basil with me, and I brought home a parlor palm I had received from Pastor Jason but had left at the church when I retired for fear that Kitty would eat it. Once we added furniture to the porch, I brought my indoor plants outside with the exception of the lilies. I thoroughly enjoyed my own little green space until last week when the cold fronts were predicted.

I crossed my fingers and set the cacti and the violet back in the kitchen, but I had no idea Small bathroom with plantswhat to do with the other plants. My previous experience with hibiscus plants was with two that were planted in my yard. My green-thumbed neighbor advised me to mow them down to the ground in the fall and expect them to pop back up in the spring. That worked, but I didn’t think my two would react the same way. In each of the pots, several plants had been intertwined and trimmed to form a tree shape, and I didn’t think I would get the same result if I whacked them off at the dirt.

So far, Kitty has ignored the greenery on the island, but I felt sure the larger plants on her level would be too much of a temptation for her to resist. I walked the house, looking for available space in any of her forbidden spaces. There’s the office, but she sneaks in there almost every time David opens the door, so I crossed that off the list. There’s also the middle bedroom, but between the stored furniture, the treadmill, and my inventory of books, there’s no floor space. That left the small bathroom – the really small bathroom. I have to leave space for the door to open and a little space in front of the toilet, so there’s no floor space in there either. But there is a bathtub – so that’s where the hibiscus and the palm ended up. The basil is on the counter by the sink. The plants seem to like their new home. All look healthy, and the hibiscus blooms are lasting three days instead of one, so I guess the sacrifice was worth it.

We also gave up the tub in the master bathroom several years ago when Kitty needed a second litter box. We never used the tub. It’s big and shallow, and it drains the hot water heater before the water is ankle deep. We have a separate shower, so it’s no big deal. But if someone gives us another plant or Kitty decides she needs the shower for some reason, we’re in trouble.

Blessings,

Linda

Fallen Angel Salvage

Tatia’s Tattoo

Mom’s Long Goodbye

A Long and Winding Road

Community | by Linda Brendle

Published in the Rains  County Leader on August 20, 2019:

communityAccording to several on-line dictionaries, community is 1) a group of people living in the same place or having a particular characteristic in common and 2) a feeling of fellowship with others, as a result of sharing common attitudes, interests, and goals.

Last weekend I attended the 5th Annual White Chapel Girls Retreat at the White Chapel Bed & Breakfast in Mountain Home, Texas. Every year about this time, a dozen women withdraw from everyday responsibilities and gather for Bible study and prayer along with lots of food and fellowship.

Before it became a B and B, the site of the retreat was simply the home of Julee White, a Donkey twinswoman with a heart that is much bigger than the six acres on which she lives. She has the gift of hospitality, and because of this, she has become the go-to place for strays of all kinds. At present, she has 4 dogs, 4 cats, 7 goats, and 3 donkeys in residence. The dogs and cats have free access through a pet door into the laundry room where they find a variety of food and water dishes which, although intended to be species specific, are often shared equally. The donkeys and goats share their food with each other as well as with the small herd of deer that sidle over when they hear the door to the feed shed squeak open. In addition to the four-legged critters, Julee feeds her feathered friends from countless hummingbird and regular bird feeders. The deer have been known to help themselves to the spillage there as well. Because of her many mealtime guests, especially the goats who have become very well-rounded since coming to live with her, Julee originally named her place the F & H (Fat & Happy) Ranch .

Julee also has many human friends, and her home is a museum of their love. Her lawn is encircled by a walking path lined with yard art, and her front walk is embedded with mementos, all from people who love her. The interior of her home is filled with treasures, and she can tell you who gave her each piece and when.

ChapelHowever, the focal point is the White Chapel, also referred to as the Broken Chapel. Several years ago, Julee felt a Divine Call to build a chapel toward the back of her property. She tried to brush the idea off, but it wouldn’t go away. She wanted it to have special meaning, so she sent out a call to friends for materials that were broken or discarded from other projects, and the response was overwhelming. The resulting chapel is more than can be described in this small space, but it is all she had imagined and more.

In 2014 Julee received a call from two friends who wanted to organize several women’s retreats, and they wanted to know if she wanted to participate. “Now I know why God wanted me to build the Chapel,” she said through tears. “Can we have one here?”

Friend invited friend, and in August of 2015 ten women invaded Julee’s home for the first annual White Chapel Girls Retreat. We were all a little uneasy at first. Some of us knew only one other person, and the teacher had never done anything of this scope, but Julee wasn’t fazed. She spread air mattresses on the floor, pulled casseroles out of the freezer, and by the end of the long weekend, we were all Fat and Happy sisters.

Five years later, the F & H Ranch has become the White Chapel Bed & Breakfast, and the White Chapel Girls, now an even dozen, have become a community. For most of the year, we live in places scattered across the country, but for one weekend a year we live together. I don’t know if that qualifies us as a community, but we definitely have a particular characteristic in common – we all believe in Jesus as our personal Savior. As for the second definition, that fits us to a Tee. Throughout the year, we share attitudes, interests, and goals through Facebook and email so that each year there is a feeling of fellowship as if we had been apart days instead of months.

WCG with paintings

On our last night together, we shared Communion in the Chapel. Community and Communion come from the same root word, and one definition of Communion is sharing or exchanging intimate thoughts and feelings, especially when the exchange is on a mental or spiritual level. As we communicated with God and remembered His sacrifice, we also looked around the circle and thanked God for each other.

Our world has become a scattered place where we can live, work, shop, and travel without ever seeing another person. But like Julee’s menagerie of birds and animals, we were made for community. “Reach out and touch someone” is more than a telephone company commercial.

Blessings,

Linda

Fallen Angel Salvage

Tatia’s Tattoo

Mom’s Long Goodbye

A Long and Winding Road

Pets and Their Rituals | by Linda Brendle

Published in the Rains County Leader on June 4, 2019:

Kitty 061515Kitty came to live with us four years ago this month. If you’ve followed my column for any length of time, you know that her assimilation into our family has not always been smooth. However, through the months and years, we’ve worked out routines that work for all of us. Some of them have even become rituals.

Kitty makes no secret of the fact that David is her favorite, but since I’m the first one up after a long, lonely night, she’s usually glad to see me. When I come into the kitchen, she stands by her feeding station and looks at me pitifully. While I scoop kibble into her bowl, she runs around the island counter clockwise, stops in front of her bowl, and looks up again. This time she has a more demanding look, asking without words why I’m not petting her. (more…)

Kitty’s Back | by Linda Brendle

Published in the Rains County Leader on February 12, 2019:

Cats acting strangeKitty has been in a strange mood for the last several weeks. I know you’re thinking How could you tell? – and that’s a valid question. Let’s just say her behavior has been a different kind of strange.

I’m not sure what put her into her latest tail spin, but I have a couple of ideas. A week or so ago, we were getting ready for bed, and I heard an unfamiliar noise coming from the kitchen.

“That sounded like Kitty jumping on top of the cabinets,” I said to David. He agreed, so I went to the kitchen to investigate. Sure enough, there she was, staring down at me from the cabinet above the refrigerator. I retrieved the squirt bottle and proceeded to try and convince her of the error of her ways. By the time she made it back to the floor, she was pretty wet, and I didn’t see much of her for the next few days. (more…)

Kitty unchained | by Linda Brendle

Published in the Rains County Leader on November 13, 2018:

Nuggie on a leashLast week I mentioned that I’m trying to train Kitty to wear a harness and walk on a leash. It’s not as far-fetched as it sounds. I have a cousin whose cat loves his leash – so much, in fact, that he will stand on her chest and give her a death stare when he wants to go for “walkies.” A couple of months ago I asked her if she thought it was possible to train Kitty at her advanced age. She said that with time and patience she thought it could definitely be done.

The next time we made a Walmart run, I chose an inexpensive harness in a pretty shade of blue. No bling, though. We’ll wait on that until after we see how she reacts. I hesitated a bit on the size. I knew a small wouldn’t work, but I was afraid a large would fall off. I finally settled on a medium, hoping she wasn’t bigger than fourteen inches around the chest, and I found a leash to match. All the way home, I wondered if I had wasted my ten dollars. (more…)

A Spike Update | by Linda Brendle

Published in the Rains County Leader on September 25, 2018:

City Girl Banner at BoothBesides sharing a booth with Tennille Case, another fun part of the Fair was visiting with those of you who stopped to tell me how much you enjoy reading my column each week. One gentleman specifically mentioned my Spike stories, so I thought it was time for an update. Conveniently, we’re staying with him this week, so I have news to share. Spike hasn’t been well the last several weeks, but he’s improving. In fact, he was feeling well enough to give me a hard time the first night we were here. (more…)

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