On caregivers, faith, family, and writing…

Posts tagged ‘Assisted Living’

Photo Memories of Mom’s 90th Birthday | by Linda Brendle

Mom was born 94 years ago today. On her last birthday this side of Heaven we had a birthday party for her, and the following year, I shared some of the pictures with you. I’ve been thinking about her a lot lately, so I thought I’d share them again. (more…)

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Ten Random Acts of Caregiving | by Linda Brendle

Top Ten ListIt’s been a while since I was an active caregiver. In December of 2010, Mom and Dad moved from my home to an assisted living facility near my brother in Conway, Arkansas. Since David and I moved back to Texas the next month, I was a caregiving assistant/consultant for the next eighteen months, and then with Mom and Dad both gone, I retired. But once a caregiver … last week at the Senior Center I found myself cutting up the meat on the tray of “John,” one of my friends. (more…)

Caregivers’ Attitude Matters to Alzheimer’s Patients

Researchers have found that those with Alzheimer's show a high level of 'Emotional Contagion' - the unconscious ability to mimic another person's emotions.

Researchers have found that those with Alzheimer’s show a high level of ‘Emotional Contagion’ – the unconscious ability to mimic another person’s emotions.

David Besnette at Assisted Living Directory has published another one of my articles. This one is about how those with Alzheimer’s sometimes draw their emotional cues from those around them. In it I cite an article by Virginia Hughes, and I also draw on my personal experience to explain how this phenomenon affected my relationship with Mom.

To read the complete article, CLICK HERE.

Blessings,

Linda

Respite Care Can Save a Caregiver’s Sanity | by Linda Brendle

I Need a Break!

I Need a Break!

If you are or ever have been a caregiver, you know how important it is to get a break now and then. I read an article this morning by Jeff Anderson called Tips for Taking Caregiver Vacations: Respite Care. Jeff wrote mostly about how caregivers can use short-term stays at residential care facilities to get a break. I never took advantage of this kind of respite care. The idea of making the arrangements for both Mom and Dad and packing their clothes and medications, not to mention the expense involved, was overwhelming. But there were many other kinds of respite care that gave me an occasional break in the routine and saved my sanity.

Mini-Breaks

Even when Dad could no longer hear much of what was going on and Mom couldn’t understand what she heard, we continued to go to Sunday School and worship services every Sunday. I dropped Mom and Dad at a class for older adults before going to my own class and picked them up afterward on the way to the sanctuary. It was amazing what that hour did to raise my spirits. (more…)

The Last Transition – Moving into Assisted Living

MomandDadA few weeks ago, the good people at Assisted Living Directory asked me to write an article for their website. I wrote a brief account of Mom and Dad’s journey from independent living through moving in with us and on to assisted living. The article featured one of my favorite pictures with this caption: (more…)

Senior Humor – Edition 15 | by Linda Brendle

seniors laughing 2 041712Last month www.Ageingcare.com posted an article by Marlo Sollitto called LOL: Why You Should Laugh Even When You Don’t Feel Like It. It said that laughter is good for you both physically and mentally. The author acknowledged that caregivers often find nothing funny in their lives, but even fake laughter can have positive effects. I sometimes wonder if my caregiving experience would have been easier for all of us if I had laughed more.

Two elderly ladies met at the grocery store after not seeing one another for some time.

“Oh, Helen, it’s so good to see you. How are you doing?”

“You know how it is, Joan. I’m not bad for a woman of my age. How about you?”

“I know what you mean. Other than a high this and a low that I’m fine. How’s Ted?” (more…)

Who Are You? | by Linda Brendle

????????????????????????????A friend who is also a caregiver recently confided in me that one of the hardest parts of her job is not knowing who will greet her when she gets up in the morning. Will it be the confident, efficient, take-charge man she has known for half a century, or will it be the man who is struggling with a life-threatening illness, the one whose mind is fogged by pain and medications, the one who can’t remember how to tie his shoes? (more…)

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