On caregivers, faith, family, and writing…

Posts tagged ‘autism’

Marked for Life | by Linda Brendle

Published in the Rains County Leader on June 18, 2019:

our father's childrenI’m home with all bones intact but with a heart that has more marks than I can count. Let me back up a step or two in case you didn’t read my last column. I went to Royal Family Kids Camp last week, a very special place where kids in foster care can spend five days and four nights just being kids and having fun in a safe environment. In 2013 I served as a counselor and came home with a broken ankle and a broken heart. This time I was the camp scribe. I wasn’t as actively involved in the organized games and other strenuous activities – and David was home praying that he would get his wife back in one piece – so I came home physically undamaged. But as I watched and listened with the eyes and ears of a writer, I saw and heard the struggles, heartaches, and triumphs of more children and counselors than before when I was focused on the two campers that were my responsibility. There are more stories than I can write, but here are a few.

“Jane” was so afraid of the water that she brought her own life jacket and continuously Pink wristbandquestioned her counselor about the lifeguard’s ability to save her if she got into trouble. All campers are required to pass a swim test in order to venture into the deeper end of the pool or to go over to the pond. She wanted to take the test, but she was afraid, so she practiced long and hard. By Wednesday, she was ready to try. Everyone in the pool area had seen her struggle, and they all stopped to watch. When she passed, the cheers and applause were deafening. The wrist band she earned became her pink badge of courage, and she showed it to anyone who would look the rest of the week. (more…)

How to Make Special People Feel Special | by Linda Brendle

Maria Thompson Corley and her son Malcolm

Maria Thompson Corley and her son Malcolm

When my son Christian first graduated from college, he worked for a company that helped children who had learning issues. Some of them had actual disabilities, but some simply learned in a different way than the majority of people do–in a special way, so to speak. When Christian worked with a child, it was his job to discover how that child learned and to set up a program tailored to his needs–a program that would make him feel special instead of dumb or disabled. Christian was good at what he did and was soon asked to train some of the newer tutors. One day as he checked on one of his trainees, he found her trying unsuccessfully to coax her student out from under the table. Rather than becoming frustrated with the reluctant student, Christian crawled under the table with him. The student finished his lesson and, in the process, probably felt pretty special. (more…)

When Reality Bites, Write | By Guest Blogger Krista Krueger

English: The autism friendly mark for use on t...

This blog sort of fits with my blog at www.kompletelykrista.wordpress.com  called Writing and Reality because this is part of the reality that goes with my writing.  One of my daughters is Autistic and that takes up a lot of my time.  The more therapies, the more interaction that she gets, are all things that help her development.  One of my sons also has what has been termed as delayed, so he needs less but still some help in maturing and that kind of stuff.  The amount of meetings I go to during the school year is amazing.  My husband works two jobs so that I can stay home and take care of her and the other two kids.  For roughly six years I’ve been doing this by myself.  Sometimes people try to help but when it comes to our kids, we’re very specific about who can watch them for us to get an hour out to maybe grab something to eat and that hasn’t been able to happen for a long time now. (more…)

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