On caregivers, faith, family, and writing…

Posts tagged ‘dementia’

Caregiver Quotes and Tips – Headphones | by Linda Brendle

Photo (WFAA)

Photo (WFAA)

WFAA-TV in Dallas recently ran a story about Miss Cora, a 90-year-old woman with dementia who often sits quietly all day–that is until she gets down with her tunes. I tried to embed the video, but I couldn’t get it to work. However, it is well worth an extra click to see this endearing video that shows Miss Cora and her caregiver sharing a connection that only seems to come through music.

To see the story and video, CLICK HERE.

Blessings,

Linda

winding road Cover 25 percentA LONG AND WINDING ROAD: A Caregiver’s Tale of Life, Love, and Chaos

Available now in ebook format at:

B&N // Kobo // iTunes // Amazon // Smashwords // Google Play

 

 

Two for One Caregiving | by Linda Brendle

two-for-one-caregivingThe wonderful people at Alzheimers.net, an online community dedicated to education, advocacy and supporting those whose lives have been impacted by Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia, invited me to share some thoughts on caring for two parents with dementia. Following is a short excerpt of what I wrote:

Raising twins may offer twice the love, but it often means twice the trouble. The same can be said for caring for two parents at the same time – especially when one has Alzheimer’s disease and one has vascular dementia.

Just imagine two-year-old twins who are tall enough to reach all the kitchen cabinets and strong enough to open all the appliance doors and push all the buttons.

To read the rest of the article, CLICK HERE.

Blessings,

Linda

winding road Cover 25 percentA LONG AND WINDING ROAD: A Caregiver’s Tale of Life, Love, and Chaos

Available for $6.99 at:

B&N // Kobo // iTunes // Amazon // Smashwords // Google Play

The Blog Tour Is Winding Down

winding downThe blog tour for A Long and Winding Road: A Caregiver’s Tale of Life, Love, and Chaos is coming to an end. We have a free day tomorrow, and then our last visit will be on Thursday to the website of Kathleen Pooler– “Memoir Writer’s Journey – Sharing hope one story at a time.” Kathleen will feature a guest post I wrote called “My Memoir: A Brief History.”

Kathleen has read my memoir, and she has posted a review on Amazon titled “An inspirational story of love, loss and renewal.” To read what she had to say, CLICK HERE.

If you have read A Long and Winding Road, please consider posting your own review on Amazon, Goodreads or any of the other distributors that allow feedback.

Blessings,

Linda

A LONG AND WINDING ROAD: A Caregiver’s Tale of Life, Love, and Chaos

Available now at:

B&N // Kobo // iTunes // Amazon // Smashwords // Google Play

 

Be Creative but Wary when Planning Activities for Alzheimer’s Patients | by Linda Brendle

Mom and me.

Mom and me.

When trying to decide what to write about this morning, I pulled out my “Sources” file and looked for ideas. After 300+ blog posts, it’s sometimes a challenge to come up with something new and fresh. There’s a new game on Facebook involving a list of things your friends might not know about you. I considered writing something like that, but at this point, anything I haven’t already written about myself is probably something I don’t want to reveal, so I went back to the file.

 

One item that caught my eye was an article on the Alzheimer’s Association website called “101 Activities.” It offers simple suggestions of things to do with your Alzheimer’ patient like listening to music, coloring a picture, or tossing a ball. There is no further explanation and no warning of how these simple activities might backfire. However, as you might imagine, I have a couple of tales that might give a caregiver pause before engaging in some of the activities. (more…)

Alzheimer’s Video – Rick Phelps Talks about Reference Points in Memory Loss

For those who don’t know about him, Rick Phelps was diagnosed with Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease in 2010 at the age of 57. In the hopes of raising awareness about the disease, he has made a number of videos  about his personal journey. With the same goal in mind, I’ve been posting his videos each Sunday. In today’s video, Rick talks about how loss of reference points affects a dementia patient’s ability to understand some things we take for granted like time and date. In the last half of the video, he tries to give caregivers a patient’s perspective on some common battlegrounds like hygiene issues. He also talks about his feelings about being placed in a residential care facility when the time comes. (more…)

One Way to Deal with Caregiver Guilt | by Linda Brendle

GuiltAs a dementia caregiver, I lived under a perpetual load of guilt. It was not true, rational guilt that came from wrongdoing, but rather a constant vague feeling of unrest that continually ate at me. No matter how good a job I was doing, I never felt like I was doing enough. No matter how well I handled a situation, I always felt like I could have done better. Somewhere in the back of my mind, I had the unrealistic idea that if I did everything right, Mom and Dad would get better. When this didn’t happen, when they continued to slip away from me, I wrestled with the feeling that they were losing the battle and that somehow it was my fault.

For several years I helped facilitate a caregiver support group at my church, and I discovered that I was not alone in my struggle with guilt. Most of the members of the group dealt with the same issue. We knew that, for the most part, our feelings were unfounded and that we were doing the best job possible under the circumstances. We focused a lot of attention on encouraging each other and finding ways to overcome this guilt. (more…)

Caregivers Must Control Medications for Dementia Patients | by Linda Brendle

Six Suggestions that Will Make the Job Easier

I cared for Mom and Dad for 15 years. They both had physical ailments, but the most challenging issues were mental; Mom had Alzheimer’s and Dad had vascular dementia. Control becomes an issue between caregiver and patient, and my biggest conflict with Dad, aside from when I took his car keys, was when I took control of the medications. (more…)

%d bloggers like this: